Valentine's Day Symbols

Valentine's Day > Symbols

Wedding Basket

Traditionally, Navajo weddings include a special ceremonial basket to represent the union of two people destined to be together. Made of interwoven coils, the braided basket is said to symbolise the joining of soul mates for all eternity.

Lover's Knot

The tying of knots symbolises love, loyalty and friendship.

According to European folklore, a woman could retain her lover's interest by tying a knot in his handkerchief and placing it in his breast pocket.

Bridal bouquets often have cascading ribbons in which many knots have been tied, each one holding wishes for fidelity and happiness.

Forget-Me-Not

German legend tells of a knight and his lady who were walking along the river banks on the eve of their wedding when they saw a spray of beautiful flowers in the river below. The lady begged him to retrieve them for her and as he dove into the water, clutching the flowers in his hand he was swept away by the turbulent waters. Struggling against the current, the knight cried out "forget me not", giving the flowers their name.

Rosemary

Sprigs of rosemary are often used in a bride's bouquet or hair wreath, as well as in the groom's boutonniere. After the ceremony the sprigs were planted in the garden of the new home for the couple's future daughters to use.

Wedding guests were also presented with a branch of rosemary as a symbol of love and loyalty.

Rose

Venus, the Roman goddess of love, carried a vial of precious nectar as she hurried off to see her lover Adonis. On her way, she carelessly stepped on a thorn and punctured her foot. Blood stained the thorny bush and nectar spilled on its leaves. Where blood and nectar mingled, a beautiful red rose appeared.